Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar

Health Services

Katie Sparks
Nurse


ksparks@eastchambers.net

EC Health Forms

          Prescription Medication Form

          OTC Medication Form   (English and Spanish)         

          Self Administer Medication Form

          EC Food Allergy Request          EC Allergy Action Plan

 

 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES

(Si usted necesita esta informacion en espanol por favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su nino/a.)

To protect other students from contagious illnesses, students infected with certain diseases are not allowed to come to school while contagious. If a parent suspects that his or her child has a communicable or contagious disease, the parent should contact the school nurse or principal so that other students who might have been exposed to the disease can be alerted.

The school nurse or the principal’s office can provide information from the Texas Department of Health regarding these diseases.


24 Hours Fever-Free

A student with a temperature of 100.0 or above will be sent home and must remain fever-free, without the use of fever reducing medicines, for 24 hours before returning to school.

 

Bacterial Meningitis

State law specifically requires the District to provide the following information:

What is meningitis?

Meningitis is an inflammation of the covering of the brain and spinal cord. It can be caused by viruses, parasites, fungi, and bacteria. Viral meningitis is most common and the least serious. Bacterial meningitis is the most common form of serious bacterial infection with the potential for serious, long-term complications. It is an uncommon disease, but requires urgent treatment with antibiotics to prevent permanent damage or death.

What are the symptoms?

Someone with meningitis will become very ill. The illness may develop over one or two days, but it can also rapidly progress in a matter of hours. Not everyone with meningitis will have the same symptoms.

Children (over 1 year old) and adults with meningitis may have a severe headache, high temperature, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights, neck stiffness or joint pains, and drowsiness or confusion. In both children and adults, there may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots. These can occur anywhere on the body.

The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory results.

How serious is bacterial meningitis?

If it is diagnosed early and treated promptly, the majority of people make a complete recovery. In some cases it can be fatal or a person may be left with a permanent disability.

How is bacterial meningitis spread?

Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are as contagious as diseases like the common cold or the flu, and they are not spread by casual contact or simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. The germs live naturally in the back of our noses and throats, but they do not live for long outside the body. They are spread when people exchange saliva (such as by kissing; sharing drinking containers, utensils, or cigarettes). The germ does not cause meningitis in most people. Instead, most people become carriers of the germ for days, weeks or even months. The bacteria rarely overcome the body’s immune system and causes meningitis or another serious illness.

How can bacterial meningitis be prevented?

Do not share food, drinks, utensils, toothbrushes, or cigarettes. Limit the number of persons you kiss.

While there are vaccines for some other strains of bacterial meningitis, they are used only in special circumstances. These include when there is a disease outbreak in a community or for people traveling to a country where there is a high risk of getting the disease. Also, a vaccine is recommended by some groups for college students, particularly freshmen living in dorms or residence halls. The vaccine is safe and effective (85-90%). It can cause mild side effects, such as redness and pain at the injection site lasting up to two days. Immunity develops within 7 to 10 days after the vaccine is given and lasts for up to 5 years.

What you should do if you think you or a friend might have bacterial meningitis?

Seek prompt medical attention.

Where can you get more information?

Your school nurse, family doctor, and the staff at your local or regional health department office are excellent sources for information on all communicable diseases. You may also call your local health department or Regional Texas Department of Health office to ask about meningococcal vaccine. Additional information may also be found at the web sites for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: www.cdc.gov and the Texas Department of Health: www.dshs.state.tx.us 

 

FLU SEASON

(Si usted necesita esta informacion en espanol por favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su nino/a.)

The single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine each season.  Vaccines may be received at:

1.       Your Private Physician

2.       Chambers County Health Dept. ( 409-267-8356)

3.       Riceland Pediatric Clinic (409-296-6000)

4.       Beaumont City Health Dept. (409-832-4000)

 

 

IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS

(Si usted necesita esta informacion en espanol por favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su nino/a.)

 

Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP/DTP/DT/Tdap/Td)

 

For K — 6th grade: 5 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine; 1 dose must have been received on or after the 4th birthday. However, 4 doses meet the requirement if the 4th dose was received on or after the 4th birthday. For students aged 7 years and older, 3 doses meet the requirement if 1 dose was received on or after the 4th birthday.

For 7th grade: 1 dose of Tdap is required if at least 5 years have passed since the last dose of tetanus-containing vaccine.

For 8th — 12th grade: 1 dose of Tdap is required when 10 years have passed since the last dose of tetanus-containing vaccine. Td is acceptable in place of Tdap if a medical contraindication to pertussis exists.

 

 

Polio (IPV)

 

For K — 12 grade: 4 doses of polio; 1 dose must be received on or after the 4th birthday.  However, 3 doses meet the requirement if the 3rd dose was received on or after the 4th birthday.

 

 


Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR)

 

For K — 12 grade: 2 doses are required, with the 1st dose received on or after the 1st birthday. Students vaccinated prior to 2009 with 2 doses of measles and one dose each of rubella and mumps satisfy this requirement.

 

 

 

Varicella

 

For K — 12th grade: 2 doses are required.  The 1st dose of varicella must be received on or after the 1st birthday.

 

 

Hepatitis A

 

For K — 8th grade: 2 doses are required.  The 1st dose of hepatitis A must be received on or after the 1st birthday.

 

 

Hepatitis B

 

A 3-dose series is required.

 

Please check with your physician and get the immunizations that will be required for your student when they enter the new school year.  Bring your school nurse a copy of immunizations given so that school records can be updated.

 

Refer to the 2017-18 Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12.

 

 

 

MEDICINE AT SCHOOL

(Si usted necesita esta informacion en espanol por favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su nino/a.)

Only the school nurse and authorized employees may administer medication. For short term use, such as an antibiotic, the medication must be given to the school nurse in the original, properly labeled container, provided by the parent/guardian, along with a signed written request.

 

Prescription medication for long term use, such as a medication for ADD or seizures, must be given to the school nurse in the original, properly labeled container, provided by the parent, along with a signed written request from the parent and a U.S. licensed physician.

 

Nonprescription medication must be received in the original, properly labeled, sealed container, provided by the parent along with a signed written request. Herbal preparations, dietary supplements, and medication filled or purchased outside the U.S. will not be administered.

For student safety, all medication should be transported to and from school by a parent/guardian.

 

<<Link to Prescription Medication Form>>

 

<<Link to OTC Medication Form>>

 

<<Link to Self Administered Medications Form>>

 

 

 

 

FOOD ALLERGIES

(Si usted necesita esta informacion en espanol por favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su nino/a.)

Nearly every school has or has had a student with a food or medication allergy. School administrators want to keep your child safe, so speak with a principal, teacher, or school nurse about setting up a safe environment if your child has any allergies and an action plan in case your child has a reaction while in school.

 

<<Link to EC Food Allergy Request>>

 

<<Link to EC Allergy Action Plan>>

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL HEALTH ADVISORY COUNCIL

(Si usted necesita esta informacion en espanol por favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su nino/a.)

Every independent school district is required by law to have a School Health Advisory Council; of which the majority of members must be parents who are not employed by the school district (Title 2, Chapter 28, Section 28.004 of the Texas Education Code).

The School Health Advisory Council meets a minimum of four times each year as required by state law.  The 2019-2020 meeting dates are December 3, January 14, March 24, and April 28 at 4:00pm in the EC Elementary cafeteria. 

Important Links

Texas Department of School Health Services        **this link is NEW site

Tips for Raising Safe and Healthy Kids

Test Your Knowledge About Kids’ Health